Dry Dock – History, Types, Advantages and Innovation

Every machine needs repairing, maintenance and constant upkeep for smooth functioning. Dry Docking is the process followed for the periodic repair and maintenance of ships, boats and watercrafts. Dry Docking is a method of ship repair being practiced for decades. It is a process of manufacturing, repair and maintenance of ships in an area known as the ‘lock’. In simple words, a lock is like a ‘garage’ for repairing ships. The only difference being, a lock is constructed aligning the shore for easy manoeuvre of the ship and sea water drainage. The main purpose of a Dry Dock is to expose the underwater parts for inspection, repair and maintenance. The ship to be repaired is hence manoeuvred into the lock and the gates are sealed post which all the sea water accumulated in the vessel is drained for better inspection and repairs. According to SOLAS, active ships that fall under the 100A5 category have to be subjected to a bottom survey twice every 5 years. Also, a Merchant Vessel which is older than 15 years needs to be checked for breaches or any defaults twice in every five years. In case of Passenger Ships, the repair period is every two years. The primary goal of a Dry Dock is to carry out effective repairs and maintenance of the parts that … Continue reading Dry Dock – History, Types, Advantages and Innovation

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Understanding Shipping Safety with SOLAS

Why SOLAS? Seafaring was in vogue during the 19th and early 20th century when air carriers were yet to set a firm footing in international transport. Passenger transport through ships was much more frequent than it is today, and so were the accidents and disasters that took place along with it. The annual loss of life from British ships alone averaged between 700 and 800 during this period. When the invincible, White Star Liner Titanic, the safest ship of her times, drowned in the Atlantic in 1912 killing more than 1500 passengers and crew, the international fraternity felt the need to have a set of guidelines that would make seafaring safer. And that’s when SOLAS was born. How Did It Come Into Action? The International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea was adopted first at a conference held in London in 1914. This convention touched upon various chapters of safety at sea like navigation, construction, radiotelegraphy, life-saving appliances, and fire protection. But the central aspect of 1914 SOLAS convention was laws and rules to prevent loss of human life at Sea. Under the ruling body of IMO, four more conventions were adopted. The 2nd one was in 1929 and entered into force in 1933. The 3rd in 1948 and came into effect in 1952; the 4th (under the … Continue reading Understanding Shipping Safety with SOLAS

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